1991 American Silver Eagle

1991 American Proof Silver Eagle

The sixth year that the United States minted the American Silver Eagle Dollar was 1991. You can Buy Silver from here. The quality of the Silver Eagles dropped a little bit during the early and middle 1990s, being more cloudy and not as attractive. The 1991 American Eagle Silver Dollar was minted as 7,191,066 Uncirculated coins and 511,924 proof eagles. The value of this year is about that of most years around $20 in most Mint State conditions and then around $38 as a 1991-S American Silver Eagle Proof Dollar.

This Uncirculated American Eagle Silver Dollar was hand selected from an original roll and placed in a protective holder using cotton gloves. These coins, which contain one ounce of .999 pure silver make great gifts, prizes, collectibles and investments!

Buy 1991 American Silver Eagle at Amazon
Buy 1991 American Silver Eagle Proof at Amazon

[nms:1991 silver eagle,3,1,10,customid,override]

1990 American Silver Eagle

1990 Silver American Eagle Brilliant Uncirculated Coin

The 1990 American Silver Eagle is a must to add to any coin collection. 1990 was the fifth year that the American Silver Eagle was minted. It was made as 5,840,210 coins to be put into the market as uncirculated and then 695,510 coins made as proofs. It is average for Silver Eagles, worth around $20 in Mint State conditions and then about $29 as a 1990-S American Silver Eagle Proof Coin.
A fantastic piece to add to your collection! You will receive a 1990 Brilliant Uncirculated Silver American Eagle. American Eagle Silver Bullion Coins are affordable, beautiful collectibles, thoughtful gifts and memorable incentives or rewards. Above all, as legal tender, they’re the only silver bullion coins whose weight and purity are guaranteed by the United States Government. They’re also the only silver coins allowed in an IRA. The silver AE obverse design comes from Adolph Weinman?s full length figure of Liberty in full stride, with her right hand extended and branches of laurel and oak in her left hand. The silver AE reverse contains 13 stars and a heraldic eagle with its wings spread open, holding an olive branch and arrows. Silver has historically been the most affordable precious metal. Since 1986, the United States has minted one-dollar silver coins called “Silver Eagles.” Each contains a minimum of one troy ounce of 99.9% pure silver. Affordability, credibility and beauty are the qualities that have made American Eagle Silver Bullion Coins the world’s best-selling silver coins, with more than 130 million sold since 1986.

Buy 1990 American Silver Eagle at Amazon

Buy 1990 American Proof Silver Eagle at Amazon

[nms:1990 silver eagle,3,1,10,customid,override]

1989 American Silver Eagle

1989 AMERICAN SILVER EAGLE PROOF $1 DOLLAR COIN W/BOX

The 1989 American Silver Eagle is another great piece of American History. The coin both beautiful and inexpensive, but as silver prices rise, so will the value of this coin, making it a nice investment. American Silver Eagle Coins also make great gifts. The 1989 Silver Eagle was minted as 5,203,327 uncirculated bullion coins and 617,694 proof coins. The design is that of the Liberty Walking Half Dollars that were minted from 1916-1947. The 1989 American Eagle is valued at about $20 in Mint State condition and rises to about $30 as a proof coin.
We are proud to offer this beautiful American Eagle Silver Dollar Proof that comes in its original US Mint box with a Certificate of Authenticity (COA).

The American Silver Eagle is the official silver bullion coin of the United States. It was first released by the United States Mint on November 24, 1986. It is struck only in the 1 troy oz denomination which has a nominal face value of one dollar and is guaranteed to contain one troy ounce of .999 pure silver.

It is authorized by the United States Congress and its weight and content is certified by the United States Mint. The American Silver Eagle bullion coin may be used to fund Individual Retirement Account investments. The Silver Eagle has been produced at three mints: one is the Philadelphia mint, and some of those issued there carry a “P” mintmark; in the early years of the series, the San Francisco mint issued proofs and these bear an “S”; more recent proofs are from the mint at West Point, New York. The latter have a “W” on the reverse.

Don’t miss out on this fabulous coin which displays beautiful frosted cameos with mirror like fields.

Buy 1989 American Silver Eagle Proof at Amazon

Buy 1989 American Silver Eagle at Amazon

[nms:1989 silver eagle,3,1,10,customid,override]

United States Mint Offers 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial One-Cent Coins Through Online Subscription Program Cent Coins

Mint Seal

WASHINGTON – The United States Mint will offer two-roll sets of the third and fourth redesigned 2009 Lincoln Bicentennial One Cent Coins-featuring coins emblematic of Abraham Lincoln’s professional life in Illinois and presidency in Washington, D.C.-through its Online Subscription Program beginning June 24, 2009. Pricing for the Lincoln Bicentennial One Cent Coin Two-Roll Set Subscription is set at $8.95 per unit. Customers may enroll in the program to receive the maximum household limit of five units. Multiple subscriptions that result in quantities exceeding the household limit will be cancelled.

1988 American Silver Eagle

1988 AMERICAN SILVER EAGLE PROOF $1 DOLLAR COIN W/BOX

The 1988 American Silver Eagle is great for any coin collection. It is the third coin of the American Silver Eagle series and is available from both Ebay and Amazon. The 1988 American Silver Eagle Coin was minted as 5,004,646 regularly struck coins and as 557,730 proof coins. The value of this coin is around the same of all the other dollars, about $20 in Mint State and then about $30+ as a Proof coin.

We are proud to offer this beautiful American Eagle Silver Dollar Proof that comes in its original US Mint box with a Certificate of Authenticity (COA) from Amazon.

The American Silver Eagle is the official silver bullion coin of the United States. It was first released by the United States Mint on November 24, 1986. It is struck only in the 1 troy oz denomination which has a nominal face value of one dollar and is guaranteed to contain one troy ounce of .999 pure silver.

It is authorized by the United States Congress and its weight and content is certified by the United States Mint. The American Silver Eagle bullion coin may be used to fund Individual Retirement Account investments. The Silver Eagle has been produced at three mints: one is the Philadelphia mint, and some of those issued there carry a “P” mintmark; in the early years of the series, the San Francisco mint issued proofs and these bear an “S”; more recent proofs are from the mint at West Point, New York. The latter have a “W” on the reverse.

Don’t miss out on this fabulous coin which displays beautiful frosted cameos with mirror like fields.

Buy 1988 American Silver Eagle at Amazon

[nms:1988 silver eagle,3,1,10,customid,override]

1987 American Silver Eagle

1987 American Eagle Silver Dollar

The 1987 American Silver Eagle is the second year that the official bullion coin of the United States was minted. The coin was minted as both a proof and a regular circulation coin. The 1987 Uncirculated American Silver Eagle was made as 11,442,335 coins along with 904,732 1987 Proof Dollars that were minted. This dollar is worth about $20 in Mint State conditions and a few dollars more as a Proof American Silver Eagle

This Uncirculated American Silver Eagle Dollar was hand selected from an original roll and placed in a protective holder using cotton gloves. These coins, which contain one ounce of .999 pure silver make great gifts, prizes, collectibles and investments!

Buy 1987 American Silver Eagle at Amazon

Buy 1987 American Silver Eagle Proof Dollar at Amazon

[nms:1987 silver eagle,3,1,10,customid,override]

1986 American Silver Eagle

1986 AMERICAN SILVER EAGLE PROOF $1 DOLLAR COIN W/BOX

The 1986 American Silver Eagle is a great coin which features a very similar design to that of the Liberty Walking Silver Half Dollars. It was minted as 5,393,005 Uncirculated dollars as well as 1,446,778 Proof dollars. The value of this coin is typically around $20 or so in Uncirculated condition. It is worth a few dollars more as a Proof coin. This coin will not be able to be found in supreme condition forever, so buy yours today.
We are proud to offer this beautiful American Eagle Silver Dollar Proof that comes in its original US Mint box with a Certificate of Authenticity (COA).The American Silver Eagle is the official silver bullion coin of the United States. It was first released by the United States Mint on November 24, 1986. It is struck only in the 1 troy oz denomination which has a nominal face value of one dollar and is guaranteed to contain one troy ounce of .999 pure silver.

It is authorized by the United States Congress and its weight and content is certified by the United States Mint. The American Silver Eagle bullion coin may be used to fund Individual Retirement Account investments. The Silver Eagle has been produced at three mints: one is the Philadelphia mint, and some of those issued there carry a “P” mintmark; in the early years of the series, the San Francisco mint issued proofs and these bear an “S”; more recent proofs are from the mint at West Point, New York. The latter have a “W” on the reverse.

Don’t miss out on this fabulous coin which displays beautiful frosted cameos with mirror like fields.

Buy 1986 AMERICAN SILVER EAGLE PROOF $1 DOLLAR COIN W/BOX at Amazon

Buy 1986 Uncirculated American Silver Eagle at Amazon

[nms:1986 silver eagle,3,1,10,customid,override]

$10 Indian Head Eagle Gold Coins – 1907 to 1933

By: John Douglas

The $10 Indian Head Eagle gold coin, also know as the $10 Eagle, minted from 1907 to 1933, is considered to be one of the most beautiful American gold coins produced by the U.S. Mint. Its production came about through the insistence of President Theodore Roosevelt. He did not like the current design on his Inaugural Medal that was designed by Charles E. Barber and George T. Morgan, nor other coins being produced by the mint at the time.

The President had some artistic friends who encouraged him to have it re-done. “I think our coinage is artistically of atrocious hideousness,” President Theodore Roosevelt wrote in a note to Secretary of the Treasury Leslie Mortier Shaw on December 27, 1904, and then continues, “Would it be possible, without asking permission of Congress, to employ a man like
Saint-Gaudens to give us a coinage that would have some beauty?”

President Roosevelt commissioned the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens for the task of coming up with a new design. Saint-Gaudens accepted this assignment, but was so terribly busy that he only had time to sketch out some rough ideas on a paper napkin while making the train trip from
Washington. He had told President Roosevelt that he would need to have his associate, Adolf A. Weinman, to do most of the actual work on the design. Collectors today will probably know Weinman for his work on the Mercury dime and the Walking Liberty Half Dollar.

Several modifications of the initial design were made for reasons of minting problems and the $10 Indian Head Gold coin was finally released to the public. There were 239,406 of these that were put into circulation in the fall of 1907. They continued using this last design until the early part of
1908.

Indian Head Eagles are 26.80 mm in diameter, weigh 16.718 grams and are composed of .900 fine gold. The reverse depicts a standing eagle, wings slightly spread, regal in appearance. The obverse depicts Lady Liberty wearing a Native American war bonnet. The edge of the coin is unique decorated with 46 raised stars for the 46 current states in the union at the time instead of the typical reeded edges that had become so common.

President Roosevelt strongly felt that using the words In God We Trust was blasphemous so they did not appear on these new coins at first. So there were 33,500 of these coins made in Philadelphia, and another 210,000 in Denver that did not have those words on them in 1907 and 1908. However, Congress was not happy with this decision and insisted that the words be put
back on the coins. In 1908 they appeared to the left of the eagle on the back side of the $10 Indian Head Gold coin. The mint marks for Denver (D) and San Francisco (S) appear to the left of the bundle of arrows the eagle is standing on. There is no mint mark for $10 Indian Head Eagles produced in Philadelphia.

While there were regular issue coins that were made at all of the mints from 1908 to 1911, and then in 1914, only Philadelphia and San Francisco Mints made eagles in 1912, 1913 and 1915. They were made only in San Francisco in 1916 and 1920.

As far as collecting goes, there have been a few of both the 1930-S and the 1933 $10 Indian Head Gold coins that have shown up periodically. If you are looking for scarce and rare coins to add to your collection, you will want to search for the ones with 1909-D, 1911-D 1913-S, 1915-S and 1920-S. All of these coins are rare, especially in mint state condition. So you are a lucky collector if you find any of them. Common date Indian Head Eagles are widely available in mint state certified condition at reasonable prices. The $10 Indian Head Eagle was well received when introduced to the public in 1907 and continues to be popular with collectors today.

Article Source: http://collectibles-articles.com

An avid fan and collector of American gold and silver coinage, John Douglas writes extensively on the history and mintage of pre-1933 American Gold Coins. Find in depth information about collecting American Gold Coins, their history and design, and supplies for all coin collectors at www.americangoldcoinshop.co

$5 Indian Head Half Eagle Gold Coins – 1908 to 1929

By: John Douglas

America in 1908 was a nation in the midst of wide ranging social and economic change. Headlines of the day sound like they were ripped right from todays news. Women were banned from smoking in public in New York City. A car began production that was advertised to get 25 miles to the gallon. The first “Round the World” car race was staged. New Years Day was celebrated by the famous ball dropping for the first time in New York’s Times Square. And the new $5 Indian Head Half Eagle gold coin, as well as its smaller sibling the Quarter Eagle, debuted in November 1908 to great controversy.

President Theodore Roosevelt had determined it was time for the nations coinage to change and become more beautiful. The well known sculptor Bela Lyon Pratt designed the obverse and reverse for the Half Eagle as well as the smaller Quarter Eagle. And the design was controversial from the start. It didn’t look like the typical American gold coin with its incuse, or sunken, design. Complaints were made that the portrait of the Native American model appeared emaciated. Banks complained the gold coins were difficult to stack and would be too easy to counterfeit. It was even claimed by some that the coins design would harbor dirt, germs and disease making them a hygiene problem, all of which proved untrue.

Roosevelt let the coins production move forward as planned despite the complaints and the complainers. The $5 Indian Head Half Eagles production lasted only a few, short years from 1908 through 1916. It was resurrected again in 1929 with a production run of 662,000 pieces but the majority of those were destroyed before ever leaving the mint. It was the last time a $5 Half Eagle gold coin was to be minted for circulation in the United States. From the time American gold coins were first minted in 1795 to 1916 the $5 gold coin only missed production in 3 years, 1801, 1816 and 1817. It was one of the most successful denominations produced by the U.S. Mint.

Today, the $5 Indian Head Half Eagle is one of the most popular collectible American gold coins. It is relatively inexpensive when compared with its big brother, the $20 St. Gaudens Double Eagle.

The obverse features a proud Native American facing left and wearing a War Bonnet. Around the obverse are 13 stars and the word LIBERTY featured at the top. At the bottom is the year produced and just above the year are the initials of Bela Lyon Pratt. A standing Eagle dominates the reverse of the coin standing on a bundle of arrows. Around the circumference is UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, to the left of the Eagle is E PLURIBUS UNIM, to the right the motto IN GOD WE TRUST. Physically the coin is 21.60 mm in diameter, weighs 8.359 grams and is .900 pure gold. There are key dates that stand out in this series. Obviously 1929 is one, followed by the 1909-O and 1911-D.

Because of its design it is somewhat difficult to be graded correctly, especially by those unfamiliar with its unique design, because it doesn’t have the traditional high spots where you’d normally look for wear. That’s why it’s important to look for coins that are graded by either PCGS or NGC, or that you know and trust the person from where you are purchasing the coin.

These beautiful American gold coins enjoy a very strong following and sell quickly, especially in certified mint state or about uncirculated condition. They are a great addition to anyones coin collection. The $5 Indian Head Half Eagle is far more popular today than during the time it was produced.

Article Source: http://collectibles-articles.com

An avid fan and collector of American gold and silver coinage, John Douglas writes extensively on the history and mintage of pre-1933 American Gold Coins. Find in depth information about collecting American Gold Coins, their history and design, and supplies for all coin collectors at www.americangoldcoinshop.com

What Kind Of Coin Collector Are You?

Casual coin collecting

The most ordinary type of coin collector is the casual collector. Casual collectors are both kids and adults. They collect random coins because they like the fun of it. The casual coin collector does not spend as much money on buying and preserving coins as a more advanced coin collector. Casual coin collectors usually have interest in coins with a special meaning to them, like for instance a coin minted in their year of their birth. Casual collectors often get hold of more interesting pieces as gifts from friends or family members. The gift of a rare coin has transformed many casual collectors to curious collectors instead.

Curious coin collecting

When a collector goes further than just circulation finds and getting gifts. He develops more of an interest in coins and becomes more a curious collector. The curious collector will buy some inexpensive coins, maybe look around coin shops or look at coins on eBay or other related internet sites. That way a survey of potentially interesting areas of coin collecting is made, and as the curious coin collector interacts with more seasoned collectors, he is bit by bit learning the trade of buying or selling coins. Like for instance studying coin books before making any serious decisions about buying expensive coins. At a point most curious collectors learn enough to become an advanced coin collector.

Advanced coin collecting

Every advanced coin collector is a unique coin collector. Some are dedicated generalists looking for a few examples of all kinds of coins. If they do have enough resources, this can result in an astounding collection, as that of King Farouk of Egypt, who collected everything he could get his hands on.

Many coin collectors are completists who want an example of everything within a certain set. For instance Louis Eliasberg was the only coin collector thus far to assemble a complete set of known coins of the United States. Other coin collectors focus on coins of a certain nation or historic period. And some collect coins from various nations or settle on error coins or exonumia like tokens and medals. As you can see, it can vary a lot.

At the highest levels of coin collecting, it is a highly competitive sport. It can lead to astronomical prices as enthusiastic collectors struggle for the very best examples of each date and mint mark combination.

Historical coin collecting

Coin collectors of ancient and medieval coins are more interested in historical significance than other coin collectors. The coins of Byzantine, Roman, Indian, Greek, Celtic, Merovingian, Parthian, Ostrogothic and ancient Israelite origin are among the most popular ancient coins collected. Specialties tend to vary a lot, but the common approach is collecting coins minted during a particular emperor’s time in power. A completist would for example strive for a representative coin from each emperor.

National coin collecting

Usually coin collectors of national coins specialize in the coins of their own country. A common way to collect national coins includes collecting one of every date and mint mark for a particular series. This is termed collecting by type. For instance a date set in Britain may include one Queen Victoria large penny for each year, 1837–1901. In another example a U.S. type set might include an example of each variety of each denomination produced. Most coin collectors of national coins create unique combinations of date, mint mark and type sets.

Error coin collecting

Collecting error coins is a modern development made doable through the automation of coin manufacturing processes. Coin collectors of ancient and medieval coins; accept coins with errors because manual coin manufacturing processes lend unique features to each coin struck.

Examples of coin errors could be repunched mint marks, doubled dies, double strikes, overdates, off metal coins, clipped coins, displaced or off center coins, and different denominations on two sides of one coin.

World coin collecting

World coins are collections of relatively recent modern coins from nations around the world. Geography is often the engine for this type of collector; he can travel around the world through his coin collection. Many collect by subject, for instance collecting coins from around the world featuring animals.

World coins are usually inexpensive and may be a good starting point for children. Most children find foreign coins by looking under change-to-cash machines, where customers throw away assorted coins found in their penny jars. It is possible to find coins from all over the world, ranging from Canada, to South Africa, to Korea.