What Kind Of Coin Collector Are You?

Casual coin collecting

The most ordinary type of coin collector is the casual collector. Casual collectors are both kids and adults. They collect random coins because they like the fun of it. The casual coin collector does not spend as much money on buying and preserving coins as a more advanced coin collector. Casual coin collectors usually have interest in coins with a special meaning to them, like for instance a coin minted in their year of their birth. Casual collectors often get hold of more interesting pieces as gifts from friends or family members. The gift of a rare coin has transformed many casual collectors to curious collectors instead.

Curious coin collecting

When a collector goes further than just circulation finds and getting gifts. He develops more of an interest in coins and becomes more a curious collector. The curious collector will buy some inexpensive coins, maybe look around coin shops or look at coins on eBay or other related internet sites. That way a survey of potentially interesting areas of coin collecting is made, and as the curious coin collector interacts with more seasoned collectors, he is bit by bit learning the trade of buying or selling coins. Like for instance studying coin books before making any serious decisions about buying expensive coins. At a point most curious collectors learn enough to become an advanced coin collector.

Advanced coin collecting

Every advanced coin collector is a unique coin collector. Some are dedicated generalists looking for a few examples of all kinds of coins. If they do have enough resources, this can result in an astounding collection, as that of King Farouk of Egypt, who collected everything he could get his hands on.

Many coin collectors are completists who want an example of everything within a certain set. For instance Louis Eliasberg was the only coin collector thus far to assemble a complete set of known coins of the United States. Other coin collectors focus on coins of a certain nation or historic period. And some collect coins from various nations or settle on error coins or exonumia like tokens and medals. As you can see, it can vary a lot.

At the highest levels of coin collecting, it is a highly competitive sport. It can lead to astronomical prices as enthusiastic collectors struggle for the very best examples of each date and mint mark combination.

Historical coin collecting

Coin collectors of ancient and medieval coins are more interested in historical significance than other coin collectors. The coins of Byzantine, Roman, Indian, Greek, Celtic, Merovingian, Parthian, Ostrogothic and ancient Israelite origin are among the most popular ancient coins collected. Specialties tend to vary a lot, but the common approach is collecting coins minted during a particular emperor’s time in power. A completist would for example strive for a representative coin from each emperor.

National coin collecting

Usually coin collectors of national coins specialize in the coins of their own country. A common way to collect national coins includes collecting one of every date and mint mark for a particular series. This is termed collecting by type. For instance a date set in Britain may include one Queen Victoria large penny for each year, 1837–1901. In another example a U.S. type set might include an example of each variety of each denomination produced. Most coin collectors of national coins create unique combinations of date, mint mark and type sets.

Error coin collecting

Collecting error coins is a modern development made doable through the automation of coin manufacturing processes. Coin collectors of ancient and medieval coins; accept coins with errors because manual coin manufacturing processes lend unique features to each coin struck.

Examples of coin errors could be repunched mint marks, doubled dies, double strikes, overdates, off metal coins, clipped coins, displaced or off center coins, and different denominations on two sides of one coin.

World coin collecting

World coins are collections of relatively recent modern coins from nations around the world. Geography is often the engine for this type of collector; he can travel around the world through his coin collection. Many collect by subject, for instance collecting coins from around the world featuring animals.

World coins are usually inexpensive and may be a good starting point for children. Most children find foreign coins by looking under change-to-cash machines, where customers throw away assorted coins found in their penny jars. It is possible to find coins from all over the world, ranging from Canada, to South Africa, to Korea.

Do You Have Precious Rare Coins In Your Purse Or Change Jar?

A Guide to Rare Coins in Circulation Today

It’s usually a small thing that turns regular looking money into valuable rare coins. Last year’s materials used instead of this year’s, a tiny symbol left off a minting die. Collectors covet the unusual and uncommon above all else, and these minor oversights result in a very limited number of coins. This means that supply is much lower than demand, and even something that looks almost exactly like a common penny can actually be a precious rare coin. Even more interesting is that many of these rare coins were released into circulation before anyone realized that a mistake had been made. Because not many people know what distinguishes precious rare coins from run-of-the-mill legal tender, these coins can remain in circulation for decades, until a lucky coin collector recognizes them.

How would you feel if you knew that you had handed over a penny worth $2,000 or more as change for a dollar? This guide will help you recognize a few exceptional American rare coins that you just might have lying around your house, shoved in a change jar, or tucked away into a pocket.

Rare Coins with Mistakes in the Printing

One of the most common mistakes that turn normal coins into limited rare coins is a mistake in the printing. In the case of a nickel minted in 1964, the problem happened when a plate was cleaned too often, and a part of one letter was worn away, leaving the Jefferson nickel with the inscription “E PLURIDUS UNUM.” It took collectors quite some time to catch on to the misspelling of the word “PLURIBUS,” but now these limited nickels are highly sought after. A similar problem resulted in the 1970-S Atheist Cent, when the motto “In God We Trust” was covered with a blob of metal, causing it to read only “In God.”

Another common oversight is when the mint mark, the tiny letter on most American coins that indicates which mint created the coin, is missing or incorrect. Some rare coins with this mistake include the The 1982 no-P Roosevelt dime. The Philadelphia mint used no mint mark until 1980, when it started stamping coins with tiny P’s. Yet somehow, a small number of dimes minted in 1982 were a throwback to the time before the mint mark, and bear no letter P. There were only a few coins with this error, and their scarce nature has made them valuable to collectors. A similar problem happened in Philadelphia a few years later, when the P on the die of some 1989 quarters was clogged with dirt, preventing the coins from being properly stamped.

Rare Coins with Double Printing

Minting problems don’t only involve the writing on the coin. Sometimes a problem with the die causes a coin to be double stamped accidentally, resulting in a very unusual form of rare coins. Some precious coins with double stamping include doubled-die Lincoln cents from 1972, 1983, and 1984, and a doubled quarter minted in New York in 2001.

Rare Coins with the Wrong Metals

Other than printing problems, another reason why rare coins can be minted is when the wrong precious metals are used to make the coins. American coins have undergone several changes in material. For example, during World War II, pennies were made out of steel, because copper was needed for the war effort. Nevertheless, a very few pennies were minted in 1943 out of copper instead. These rare coins are worth upwards of $200,000 today, and they look exactly like any other penny.

As you can see, sharp-eyed coin collectors can really make a profit by keeping their eyes for rare coins in everyday transactions. Most people wouldn’t look twice at a unique find like a 1943 copper penny or a dime that’s missing a letter nearly too small to see. By knowing what coins are limited and rare, you could make an exceptional find just sorting through your household change.

Coin Collecting

One of the most popular hobbies today is coin collecting. Coin collecting is a fun pastime that can be enjoyed by anyone.

The premise of coin collecting lies in the idea that certain coins are more valuable than others. Amateur collectors often save a coin if they notice it has a date that reaches back several decades.

Many adults and children enjoy coin collecting. For the majority of these people their collections are limited to old coins or coins from other countries. They take pleasure in finding something unusual and keeping it to show others.

There are amateur coin collectors who save a coin from each locale they travel to. They find the currency of other countries interesting and over time and through extended travel, they can compile an impressive collection.

Others only save coins that hold significance for them. This could mean a coin from the year they were born or the year their parents or siblings were born. Coin collecting in this way is a lovely testament to the person’s life and it makes a nice keepsake to pass along to the next generation.

Serious coin collecting is an art form onto itself. There are collectors who invest an incredible amount of time and money in pursuing the perfect collection.

In most cases of serious coin collecting the collector has a specialty that they concentrate on. For some it’s a certain time frame and they are always looking to obtain more coins from those years. For others it is a certain denomination of coin. They only collect quarters or pennies and they focus on finding rare denomination of these coins.

There are many places that a coin collector can go to find a new treasure. There are several auction sites online that cater to coin collecting. Images of coins are posted along with a description of their condition and price.

Many of these sites have hundreds of coins posted and for the avid collector it gives them an opportunity to contribute to their collection.

It’s often thought that in order to go into the hobby of coin collecting a person needs to be wealthy. Although it’s true that some coins are very costly the amateur collector can begin a collection on a relatively low budget.

There are affordable treasures to be found in the coin collecting market. One of the first things every coin collector should do is check their spare change on a daily basis. Although it’s not often that a valuable coin is in circulation it does happen.

Another area of coin collecting that many people are interested in is coins that contain errors. Although it doesn’t happen very often there have been coins placed into circulation that contained errors. The error might be an off-center coin or a coin that has a double mint mark. These coins can be very valuable mainly because they are one of a kind.

Finding these types of coins can be more difficult than general coin collecting but for the people who participate they get their enjoyment when they do find a coin with a mistake on it.

Coin collecting can be a fun and profitable hobby. You can start out small and once you begin to build a collection the sky is the limit.